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Archive for May, 2014

Most of the students I teach hate math and school, thinking both are a waste of their time. They also are pretty certain they have limited ability to be successful, especially in math.  (No wonder they hate school)  Fighting their negative outlook is a frustrating, uphill battle.

Today, I was on twitter looking for ideas (procrastinating) and I saw this post by @trianglemandcsd:

@Trianglemancsd

I followed his link to an article about UT Austin’s efforts to increase completion rates for disadvantaged students.  It was an interesting read suggesting success with limited time psychosocial interventions, with David Yeager brought in for implementation. Now I am always interested in new weapons in my arsenal for fighting to change my students’ outlook, so I pursued the article a little further. That lead me to this, http://rer.sagepub.com/content/81/2/267, which I put in my reply to Christopher. It is David Yeager’s and Greg Walton’s description and defense of the use of limited psychosocial interventions.

It sounded like something worth trying with my students at the beginning of next year. My brain shifted into planning mode, thinking about ways I could modify and implement, how I could document the process, and curiosity about its efficacy.

Then I saw this post from @tchmathculture, whose opinion I generally respect. Of course I had to follow her link.

@tchmathculture tweet

It led me to The Eduoptimists Blog (theeduoptimist.com) , who rightly pointed out that this one small intervention cannot possible ameliorate the difficulties faced by students with low socio-economic status (SES). She pointed out that low SES students often face costs way above and beyond the typical room, board, tuition, and books. I can attest to this myself. When I started college I had 4 children at home and we were receiving food stamps.  In addition to the typical costs, I had to borrow to cover childcare.  And I had it easy compared to most low SES students since my husband had some income.

However, while I agreed with The Eduoptimists that the psychosocial intervention was not an adequate response to the problem, I don’t think it should be discarded completely.  Even if all the financial issues were addressed, the students still have the mindset problem to overcome. So don’t throw away a tool that seems to be helpful just because it doesn’t solve the whole problem.

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